memonic

Creating Marker Durations In Final Cut Pro

Save

Creating A Duration For a Marker

1 Create a marker at the head of the area that you wish to mark by placing the playhead at that position and pressing the M key on your keyboard.

2 After you have created the marker, move the playhead to the right of the marker, where you wish for the duration to end.

3 Go to Mark > Markers > Extend and it will stretch the mareker to the playhead position.

Creating Marker Durations In Final Cut Pro

Final Cut Pro

Save

  List of shortcut keys
Shortcut Command How useful(?)
General

Final Cut Pro

Shft-Cmd-N New Project +       –
Cmd-N New Sequence +       –
Optn-Cmd-S Save All +       –
Ctrl-M Print to Video +       –
Ctrl-U Arrange Windows to Standard Layout +       –
 
Browser

Final Cut Pro

Cmd-I Import File +       –
right arrow Open Bins (List View) +       –
left arrow Close Bins (List View) +       –
Optn-Enter (on Number Pad) Open Bin in New Tab +       –
Ctrl-W Close Tab +       –
Cmd-B New Bin +       –
Cmd-4 Show/Hide Browser +       –
Cmd-5 Show Effects +       –
Cmd-6 Show Favorites +       –
Cmd-9 Item Properties +       –
Shft-H Toggle Browser View +       –
Optn-return View Item in Editor +       –
Shft-return View Item in New Window +       –
Optn-B Logging Columns (Layout view) +       –
Cmd-F Find +       –
F3 Find Next (in Find Results) +       –
 
Timeline

Final Cut Pro

N Snapping +       –
Shft-L Linked Selection +       –
F4 plus track number Lock/Unlock Video Track +       –
F6 plus track number Set Video Destination +       –
Shft-F6 Clear Video Destination +       –
F5 plus track number Lock Audio Track +       –
F7 plus track number Set Audio Destination 1 +       –
F8 plus track number Set Audio Destination 2 +       –
Shft-F7 Clear Audio Destination 1 +       –
Shft-F8 Clear Audio Destination 2 +       –
Optn-W Toggle Clip Overlays +       –
Shft-T Toggle Timeline Track Height +       –
Optn-Plus (+) Zoom In (Timeline Only) +       –
Optn-Minus (-) Zoom Out (Timeline Only) +       –
Ctrl-V Add Edit +       –
Optn-I Clear In +       –
Optn-O Clear Out +       –
Optn-X Clear In and Out +       –
Cmd-T Add Video Transition +       –
Optn-Cmd-T Add Audio Transition +       –
Shft-Z Fit Sequence to Window +       –
home Go to Beginning of Media +       –
end Go to End of Media +       –
Shft-F4 Lock All Video Tracks +       –
Shft-F5 Lock All Audio Tracks +       –
Optn-Cmd-I Mark Audio In +       –
Optn-Cmd-O Mark Audio Out +       –
Optn-R Render All: Audio and Video +       –
Shft-X Ripple Cut +       –
Optn-A Select In to Out +       –
 
Viewer

Final Cut Pro

Shft-Z Fit to Window +       –
W Toggle Wireframes +       –
X Mark Clip +       –
I Mark In +       –
O Mark Out +       –
up arrow Go to Previous Edit +       –
down arrow Go to Next Edit +       –
Shft-\ Play In to Out +       –
Spacebar Play Forward +       –
Ctrl-X Open Text Generator +       –
Ctrl-W Close Tab +       –
Cmd-1 Show/Hide Viewer +       –
 
Navigation

Final Cut Pro

enter a timecode value and press return To navigate using timecode +       –
J Rewind +       –
press J repeatedly Rewind Faster +       –
K Stop +       –
L Fast Forward +       –
press L repeatedly Fast Forward Faster +       –
Hold K and L Slow Motion Forward +       –
Hold J and K Slow Motion Backward +       –
Hold K and tap L Forward One Frame +       –
Hold K and tape J Reverse One Frame +       –
left arrow Go Back One Frame +       –
Shft-left arrow Go Back One Second +       –
Shft-I Go to In Point +       –
Shft-K Go to Next Keyframe +       –
Optn-K Go to Previous Keyframe +       –
Shft-O Go to Out Point +       –
Ctrl-L Looping Playback +       –
Optn-\ Play Every Frame +       –
Shft-Space Play Reverse +       –
Shft-P Play to Out +       –
Optn-A Select In to Out +       –
 
Markers

Final Cut Pro

M Add Marker +       –
Cmd-Tilde (~) Delete Marker +       –
Ctrl-Tilde (~) Delete All Markers +       –
Optn-Cmd-M Edit Marker +       –
Shft-down arrow Next Marker +       –
Shft-up arrow Previous Marker +       –
 
Canvas

Final Cut Pro

F9 Insert Clip +       –
F10 Overwrite Clip +       –
F11 Replace Clip +       –
F12 Superimpose Clip +       –
Shft-F11 Fit to Fill +       –
Shft-F9 Insert Clip with Transition +       –
Shft-F10 Overwrite with Transition +       –
Ctrl-I Mark Video In +       –
Ctrl-O Mark Video Out +       –
Cmd-2 Show/Hide Canvas +       –
 
Log and capture

Final Cut Pro

Cmd-8 Show Log and Capture +       –
Shft-I Go to In Point +       –
Shft-O Go to Out Point +       –
F2 Log Clip +       –
Shft-C Capture Now +       –
Ctrl-C Batch Capture +       –
Esc Stops Capture +       –
 
Motion tab

Final Cut Pro

Optn-K Go to Previous Keyframe +       –
Shft-K Go to Next Keyframe +       –
Ctrl-K Add Motion Keyframe +       –
 
Effects

Final Cut Pro

Optn-R Render All +       –
Cmd-R Render Selection (In to Out) +       –
Optn-F Make Favorite Effect +       –
Shft-N Make Freeze Frame (in Viewer) +       –

Final Cut Pro Power Tip: Changing the Default

Save

Final Cut Pro Power Tip: Changing the Default Transition

  • Twirl down Video Transitions > Dissolves. The current default transition is underlined, as shown in Figure 2.
  • If you want to use a different transition as the default, select the transition you want. If all you want is to change the length of the transition, however, click the duration in the Length column to select it and change the numbers to the duration you want, as shown in Figure 3.

Ken Stone's Final Cut Pro

Save
 

                        
                        
                                 

 

  New Releases

Luca FilmFX & Light Transitions Steve Douglas

StormChaser WindCutters for Wind Noise & Stick On WindCutters -   Review by Steve Douglas

Reinstall OS X & Final Cut Studio The Right Way - Part 3 -   By David A. Saraceno

Moving With Motion Review by Steve Douglas

Using Core Melt's Sky Replace Plug-in Steve Douglas

Trek-Tech Essentials Kit -   David A. Saraceno

Learning to Use Final Cut Pro 7 - Infinite Skills Review by Steve Douglas

Snow Leopard Not To Blame Final Cut Studio 3 Slowdown -   David A. Saraceno

Red Giant's Magic Bullet Mojo Steve Douglas

Controlling the Color Wheels in Final Cut and Apple's Color -   Patrick Inhofer

Azden SGM-1X Shotgun Microphone -   Review by Steve Douglas

Reinstall OS X & Final Cut Studio The Right Way - Part 2 -   By David A. Saraceno

Reinstall OS X & Final Cut Studio The Right Way - Part 1 -   By David A. Saraceno

Bit Budget for Compressor and DVD Studio Pro  

 

  Final Cut Pro  General
Snow Leopard Not To Blame Final Cut Studio 3 Slowdown -   David A. Saraceno      NEW

Controlling the Color Wheels in Final Cut and Apple's Color -   Patrick Inhofer      NEW

Final Cut Studio 2009 versus Final Cut Studio 2 -   David A. Saraceno      NEW

Experimenting with 3D in FCP -   Eric Cosh      NEW

Final Cut Pro 7 - The Tools of Speed -   Steve Martin

"Instant" Dailies -   Philip Hodgetts

FCP 7 - Labels, Markers and Subclips -   Ken Stone

FCP 7 Scopes - Vectorscopes -   Ken Stone

What to do with Final Cut Pro XML -   Philip Hodgetts

Final Cut Pro 7 - Scopes - Waveform Monitor -   Ken Stone

Final Cut Pro 7 - SmoothCam -   Ken Stone

Final Cut Pro 7 - Share - MobileMe -   Ken Stone

Final Cut Pro 7 - iChat Theater -   Ken Stone

Final Cut Pro 7 - Share -   Ken Stone

How to install and run Final Cut Studio 3 on a MacBook -   Jon Chappell

Burn Blu-ray playable discs on a Mac SuperDrive. -   Ken Stone

Final Cut Pro 7 First Look - 10 Things I love about Final Cut Pro 7 by Steve Martin. -   Steve Martin

Creating Watermarks in Final Cut Pro -   Steve Douglas

Render File Problems in Final Cut Pro -   Richard Taylor

Guide to Final Cut Pro Internal Tools -   by Jon Chappell

Exporting HDV and XDCAM EX to ProRes 422 with Chapter Markers -   by Ken Stone

Am I Rendering And Viewing At The Best Quality With FCP?  - by Andrew Balis

Final Cut Pro Tutorial - The SmoothCam Filter (Movie)   - by Steve Martin

Exporting Markers from FCP - for use in Compressor and DVD SP  - by Ken Stone

DVCPRO HD Aspect Ratio Bug in FCP 6  - by Frederic Lumiere

When to stay in the native codec of the source, and when to convert to something else.  - by Philip Hodgetts

Trashing Prefs in FCP 3, 4 and 5 - OS X  - by Ken Stone

Final Cut Pro 6 - A First Look  - by Steve Martin

Setting Up a Project in Final Cut 6  - by Andrew Balis

Final Cut Pro Tutorial - Saving Favorites (Movie)   - by Steve Martin

What is XML and what does it mean for Final Cut Studio users?  - by Philip Hodgetts

What's New in Final Cut 5.1.2  - by Andrew Balis

MacVideo Magazine For DV FilmMakers and Video Professionals  - by Ken Stone

Compression and Chapter Markers  - by Ken Stone

Open FCP 5 projects in FCP4.5 (4.0) with XML Export/Import   - Nick Meyers

A Guide To Setting Up Your Project In Final Cut 5  - by Andrew Balis

FCP 5 and Soundtrack Pro at LAFCPUG  - by Michael Horton

Final Cut Pro 5 - A First Look  - by Steve Martin

LiveType, SoundTrack and Compressor Quick Reference Guide  - by Darrin Sayewich

The Fundamentals of LiveType  - by Steve Martin

Roll Your Own Keyboard Shortcuts  - by Larry Jordan

How2 Upgrade to Final Cut Pro 4 - the Right Way!  - by Philip Hodgetts

Final Cut Pro 4 - Ripple Report - Sneak Peak  - by Steve Martin

Using the Timecode Log Spreadsheet  - by Scott Taylor

Capture Cards and Codecs  - Marco Solorio

Over/Underexposing Video  - By Dan Coplan

Final Cut Pro for Broadcast? Absolutely!  - By Andy Field

Why are my FCP Productions Darker on my clients PC's?  - By James Diefenderfer and Philip Hodgetts

Porting between Final Cut Pro and Adobe After Effects  - Charles Roberts

Which codecs make great video?  - by Larry Jordan

 
Film Look

Film Look for Video Revisited with Joes Filters and Final Cut Pro 4   - By Graeme Webb

Using Magic Bullet and Anamorphic in your DV project  - By Steven Galvano

Film look Techniques For Video   - By Dan Coplan

Special Film Effects from DV   - Using Eureka Plugins - By Steve Sullivan

Making Video Look Like Film   Article updated August 5, 2001 -  Shawn Bockoven

[Top]

 

  Editing  Click Here

 
  Effects  Click Here

 
  White Papers

An Introduction to Closed Captioning - FCP Workflow  - by Dan Dujnic      NEW

FCPUG Road Show in Hungary  - by Gyula Kazari

iMovie 09  - by Ken Stone

Slumdog Millionaire  - Interview by Larry "Lawrence" Jordan

Blu-ray with FCP, Compressor and Encore  - by James Fields

Cheating in Final Cut Express: Better Color Correction   - by Seth Kenlon

One Man Doco Crew in Uganda  - by Matthew Clift

Iditarod: Brutal Conditions, Beautiful Video  - by Celia Booher

Preparing for Online Distribution  - by Philip Hodgetts

DVD-Rs for Media Back-up in FCP  - by Richard Taylor

Create an Alpha Channel   - by Johan Polhem

Encoding for YouTube Using Compressor   - by Brian Gary

HVX 200 - Bare Bones Firewire Import to FCP  - by Ken Stone

The Making of Kenya, the documentary film  - by Steven Galvano

How To Shoot a Network TV Pilot With the Panasonic HVX-200  - by Dan Brockett

Shake - Using Shake to Remove the Shakes (Movie)   - by Steve Martin

Thumbnail Video Index  - By Brian Taylor

Using iWeb to Create Screener Sites (Movie)   - by Brian Gary

iWeb  - By Ken Stone

The Reading Room - Humor

WARM CARDS - White Balancing System  - Review by Bob Gladden and Steve Douglas

Avid versus Final Cut - 2006  - By Patrick Inhofer

SO YOU WANT TO GET YOUR FEET WET - but not your Camcorder   - Steve Douglas

Tips for a Demo Reel that Works   - Bill Davis

MACWORLD EXPO AND FCPUG SUPERMEET - 2006  - by Loren S. Miller

The Art of Feature Film Editing  - by Tony Salgado

Understanding 16:9 in Final Cut Pro  - by Kevin Monahan

Basic Keyframing in Final Cut Express   - by Ken Stone

Producing High Quality Underwater Video   - By Ian Sutherland

The Changeover Challenge: From Avid to Final Cut Pro 4  - by Loren S. Miller

Faking Transparency in Flash Video   -by Elliot Mebane

It's Alive! How to Make Cut-Out Animations in FCP  - by Jude Cotter

How to prepare for that first Video Safari   -by Bruce Robison & Steve Douglas

Nimble Nimbuses and Swift Sunsets - Creating Time Lapse Video  - Ben Bryant

Positioning and Compositioning    Tricky Business - Ian Sutherland

Lighting Below the Waves   - Ian Sutherland

The Taylors speak on Sharks, Film and DV   - An interview edited by Jay Garbose and Charles Roberts

NAB Preview 2005   - by Philip Hodgetts

lafcpug's New Home Or How to Build a Digital Cinema   - by Michael Horton and Chris Meyer

Avid versus Final Cut  - by Patrick Inhofer

The Changeover Challenge: From Avid to Final Cut Pro  - by Loren S. Miller

Underwater Camera Housings   - Ian Sutherland

The Curse of Digital Video - Using Filters   Barry Braverman

'Too Close for Comfort' - The story behind Subt Lemons zero budget music video    - Graeme Webb

A Final Cut Pro user looks at Avid Xpress DV 3.5  - by Ken Stone

Personal Recollections of Charles F. McConathy   - by Michael Horton

NAB 2004   - by Philip Hodgetts

The FCP Community loses a piece of its heart  - by Michael Horton

Video On The Road    Out of Country - By Greg Matty

[Top]

 

  Audio - Soundtrack Pro

 
Zoom H4n Audio recorder and Canon 5D Mark II  - By Graham Law      NEW

Final Cut Studio - 5.1 Surround Monitoring in Soundtrack Pro (Movie)   - by Steve Martin      NEW

Final Cut Studio - Adding SFX & Music to Motion Templates (Movie)   - by Mark Spencer

Mixing 5.1 surround sound with Final Cut Studio 2  - By Kasper Skårhøj

Final Cut Studio Tutorial - Time Stretching Music (Movie)   - by Steve Martin

Final Cut Pro Audio Filter Guide Part 2  - By Jon Chappell

Final Cut Pro Audio Filter Guide Part 1  - By Jon Chappell

Soundtrack Pro - Recording & Editing Multitake Voice Overs (Movie)   - by Steve Martin

Audio In Close Up - Which Lavalier Should I Use?  - by Dan Brockett

As I Hear It - Choosing the Right Microphone  - by Dan Brockett

Low Cost Shotgun Microphone Comparison -   by Dan Brockett

Soundtrack Pro Tutorial - Replace with Ambience (Movie)   - by Steve Martin

Final Cut Pro Tutorial - Subframe Audio Editing (Movie)   - by Steve Martin

Soundtrack Pro Tutorial - AppleScript Batch Processing (Movie)   - by Steve Martin

Soundtrack Pro - Get on the Bus (Movie)   - by Steve Martin

Soundtrack Pro - Using Multiple Outputs (Movie)  - by Steve Martin

Professional Mini-Disc Recorder Review -   Dan Brockett

Working with BWF Audio in FCP  - by Clay Coleman

Audio in Final Cut Pro 4.0 - "For The Working Editor"  - by Dan Brockett

Create your own AIFF converter using Compressor  - By Nick Meyers

Apple Soundtrack - Music To Video Editor's Ears  - by Dan Brockett

Location Sound: The Basics and Beyond  - by Dan Brockett

Let There Be Music - Getting Started With Soundtrack  - by Dan Brockett

Final Cut Pro 4 Audio Essentials - Optimizing Sound For Beginners  - by Dan Brockett

Technique: Exporting Using OMF   - by Larry Jordan

How to do The Blues, Composing in Soundtrack for non-musicians  - by Perry Lawrence

A Beginner's Guide to Final Cut Pro's Audio Filters   - Dan Brockett

Digital Audio in Decibels & Final Cut Pro's Audio Peak Detection Tool   - Ken Stone

Exporting Audio Only, from FCP to a CD   - by Scott Taylor

The Voice Over Tool in FCP 3   - Ken Stone

Working with Audio on the Timeline  - Ken Stone

Audio - From Camera to FCP  - Ken Stone

Integration between Final Cut Pro and Pro Tools Free   - Adam Green

One-Man-Band Audio   - Ben Bryant

What's all the fuss about Soundtrack Pro?  by Mark Spencer

'Too Close for Comfort' - The story behind Subt Lemons zero budget music video    - Graeme Webb

Editing Double-System Sound material  - by Phil Ashby

 
[Top]

 

  HD - HDV - 24P

Exporting HDV and XDCAM EX to ProRes 422 with Chapter Markers -   by Ken Stone      NEW

Capturing HDV Into ProRes Via FireWire -   by Andrew Balis      NEW

Exporting HDV Video from the Timeline to SD DVD -   by Ken Stone      NEW

Impressions of the EX1 -   by Rick Young

Iditarod: Brutal Conditions, Beautiful Video  - by Celia Booher

Outputting Standard Definition in FCP from the Sony XDCam EX1  - by Rick Young

HVX 200 - Bare Bones Firewire Import to FCP  - by Ken Stone

Beyond DV with FCP HD  - by Graeme Nattress

Mas allá de DV con FCP HD  - by Graeme Nattress - Translated by Emilio Blaxqi

Workflow With Panasonic HD And Final Cut Pro HD  - by Andrew Balis

Video Levels in Final Cut Pro   -by Graeme Nattress

When to stay in the native codec of the source, and when to convert to something else.  - by Philip Hodgetts

HDV Editing With FCP HD   - by Ned Soltz

Chroma Sampling: An Investigation  -by Graeme Nattress

Breaking Free of HDV Limitations (Sometimes editing HDV natively just doesn't "cut" it.)  - by Brad Wright

24p in Final Cut Pro HD and the DVX 100  - by Graeme Nattress

Film to Digital Video in Cinema Tools   - by Aureliano Sanchez-Arango

Painting Images with the DVX-100   - by Dan Coplan

DVX-100 Gamma Settings  - By Dan Coplan

Digital Alliteration: Panasonic, Progressive, Pulldown and "Pretty Darn Cool"  - by Charles Roberts

[Top]

 

  DVD Studio Pro - Compressor - iDVD

 
DVD Studio Pro

Burn Blu-ray playable discs on a Mac SuperDrive. -   Ken Stone      NEW

Chapter Marker Lists for DVD SP  - by Tom Stitzer

Setting Up DVD Studio Pro for 16:9  - by Ken Stone

First Play (Auto Play) in DVD SP  - by Ken Stone

Taming the Wild Blu, part 2...  - by Bruce Nazarian

Taming the Wild Blu, yonder...  - by Bruce Nazarian

How to Make a Play All Button in DVD Studio Pro 4  - by Jake Russell

HDV video to SD DVD Using Compressor 3 and DVD SP  - by James Fields

Bit Budget for Compressor and DVD Studio Pro  

Exporting HDV Video from the Timeline to SD DVD -   by Ken Stone

Creating WMV from FCP  - Ng Chee Teng

Compressor Tutorial - QuickTime Components (Movie)   - by Brian Gary

Motion/DVDSP Tutorial - Creating Alpha Transitions (Movie)   - by Steve Martin

Creating Hi-Def DVDs Using 4.7GB Type 5 DVDs   - by Rick Young

Exporting to the iPod Using Compressor   - by Seth Kenlon

Encoding for Windows Media Using Compressor - Flip4Mac   - by Brian Gary

Working with Dual Layer Media   - by Brian Gary

Authoring Dual Layer DVDs in DVD Studio Pro (Movie)   - by Steve Martin

Creating Stories in DVD Studio Pro (Movie)   - by Steve Martin

DVD Studio Pro - Translating FCP titles into DVD subtitles (Movie)   - by Steve Martin

Batch Processing Images in DVD SP and iDVD using Tiger's Automator (Movie)   - Steve Martin

Image to Disk   - by Ken Stone

Creating Subtitles in DVD Studio Pro 4  - by Ken Stone

Stories in DVD Studio Pro  - by Ken Stone

Compression and Chapter Markers  - by Ken Stone

How To Make Copies of DVDs -   by Ken Stone

Setup and Resume Authoring in DVD Studio Pro 3 -   by Alex Alexzander

A Solution to Multiple Language Video in DVD Studio Pro -   by Graeme Nattress

What's New Inside DVD Studio Pro 3 Part 1 - Transitions -   by Alex Alexzander

What's New Inside DVD Studio Pro 3 Part 2 - Alpha Transitions -   by Alex Alexzander

What's New Inside DVD Studio Pro 3 Part 3 - The Graphical View -   by Alex Alexzander

What's New Inside DVD Studio Pro 3 Part 4 -   by Alex Alexzander

DVD SP 3 - New Features -   by Ken Stone.

Review DVD ThemePAK for DVD Studio Pro 2 and iDVD 3/4  - Review by Ken Stone

BitShifting & Bit Extraction Creating a playlist function with DVD SP 2 -   by Alex Alexzander.

Subtitle Buttons Over Video - Creating an Easter Egg with DVD Studio Pro 2 -   by Alex Alexzander

DVD Studio Pro 2 All About Menus -   by Alex Alexzander

First Play - a "Bare Bones" DVD -   by Jeff Warmouth

Subtitles with DVD Studio Pro 2 -   by Alex Alexzander

Advanced Drop Zones with DVD Studio Pro 2 and Photoshop -   by Alex Alexzander

Shapes, Drop-Zones, Styles and Templates for DVD Studio Pro 2 - Creating these Assets in Photoshop. -   by Alex Alexzander

Extracting video from a DVD - Importing video from a DVD into Final Cut Pro -   by Brad Wright

Understanding DVD@CCESS or How to provide a link within DVD Studio Pro 2 to a File -   by Alex Alexander

Authoring with DVD Studio Pro 2 - Basic Mode -   by Ken Stone

How to Create an "Audio Feedback Menu" in DVD Studio Pro 2 -   by Alex Alexander

DVD Studio Pro 2: Late-Breaking News -   Apple Document

How to Build a Basic Still Menu for DVD Studio Pro -   by Darrin Sayewich

Panasonic DMR-T3040 DVD Video Recorder -   Review by Larry Silverberg

How to Build a Basic DVD in DVD Studio  - by Darrin Sayewich

Out of Final Cut Pro and into the Fire of DVD Studio Pro 1   - Jeff Warmouth

Introducing DVD Studio Pro 1.5   Bruce Nazarian

DVD Studio Pro DVD "Afterburner" for Final Cut Pro   Bruce Nazarian

Installing A SuperDrive in a G4   Step by step Instructions with photos   - Vince Hubbell

 
Compressor - AC3

Compressor 3.5 Basics -   Ken Stone      NEW

Compressor 3.5 -   Ken Stone      NEW

Burn Blu-ray playable discs on a Mac SuperDrive. -   Ken Stone      NEW

Using Compressor to Encode HD Content for Vimeo  - by Steve Douglas

Compressor - Enabling multiple Cores  - by Tom Stitzer

Encoding for YouTube Part 3...HD Strikes Back  - by Brian Gary

Converting Frame Rates in Compressor  - by Ken Stone

Preprocessing in Compressor and Episode  - by Philip Hodgetts

Compressor H.264 movies from FCP for the Web  - by Ken Stone

Blu-ray with FCP, Compressor and Encore  - by James Fields

Cinema Craft Encoder MP Plug-In for Compressor 3  - by Brian Gary

Exporting Markers from FCP - for use in Compressor and DVD SP  - by Ken Stone

YouTube Encoding: Locked & Reloaded  - by Brian Gary

Compressors' New Interface in Final Cut Studio 2  - by Ken Stone

Compressor Tutorial - Compression Markers (Movie)  - by Brian Gary

Encoding for YouTube Using Compressor   - by Brian Gary

Building Custom Presets in Compressor 2  - by Ken Stone

Create your own AIFF converter using Compressor  - By Nick Meyers

Using Compressor to encode MPEG-2 -   by Jeff Warmouth

Dolby Digital. Sure it can be done. -   by André Rousseau

Encoding AC3 Audio with A.Pack -   by Jeff Warmouth

 
iDVD

iDVD 7 In iLife 08  - by Ken Stone      NEW

Authoring in iDVD 6  - by Ken Stone

Authoring with iDVD 5 -   by Ken Stone

Authoring with iDVD 4.0.1 -   by Ken Stone

Review - iDVD 3  - Review by Ken Stone

Authoring with iDVD 2 - OS 10.1    - Ken Stone

Extracting video from a DVD - Importing video from a DVD into Final Cut Pro -   by Brad Wright

Review DVD ThemePAK for DVD Studio Pro 2 and iDVD 3/4  - Review by Ken Stone

[Top]

 

  Motion

Ripple's Designer Motion Templates -   Jerry Hofmann      NEW

Final Cut Studio - Adding SFX & Music to Motion Templates (Movie)   - by Mark Spencer

Motion - Animating Photoshop Layers in Z-Space (Movie)   - by Mark Spencer

Ken Burns Redux - Putting Your Photos in Motion (Movie)   - by Mark Spencer

Why Your Beautiful Motion Text Looks Bad in Final Cut Pro -   Mark Spencer

Reflection Effects - Motion 3 (Movie)   - by Mark Spencer

Motion/DVDSP Tutorial - Creating Alpha Transitions (Movie)   - by Steve Martin

Using the Sequence Replicator Behavior -   By: Mark Spencer

Motion 2 - Replicator and Animating Replicator -   By: Ken Stone

How to Create an Alpha Mask Using Motion 2 -   By: Steve Douglas

Working with Keyframes in Motion, Part 1 Creating and Manipulating Keyframes -   By: Mark Spencer

Motion - Basic Audio Tools -   By: Ken Stone

Motion - Using Color Mode -   By: Ken Stone

Particles in Motion -   By: Steve Martin

Motion - Under the Hood Real Time playback - Firewire Output - Pro Apps Integration -   By: Ken Stone

Motion - Text moving in a Circle Real time motion graphics -   By: Ken Stone

Motion, Video Cards, RAM, and Processor Speed -   By: David Saraceno

Getting Around in Motion -   By: Mark Spencer

Motion to NTSC via FireWire: Previewing your Motion projects through FireWire VTR -   By: Alex Alexzander.

Motion Compatibility Checker -   Technical Specifications for Motion

[Top]

 

  Color

Controlling the Color Wheels in Final Cut and Apple's Color -   Patrick Inhofer      NEW

Color Workflows With Different Types of Sources -   Andrew Balis

Introduction to COLOR -   Seth Kenlon

Controlling Apple's Color - EclipseCX Control Surface -   Patrick Inhofer

Vignettes in Color   - by Ken Stone

Matting and Color Correction in COLOR   - by Seth Kenlon

Color Tutorial - Working with Grades (Movie)  - by Andrew Balis

Creating Node Trees in Color - FC Studio 2   - by Wendy Gribble

[Top]

 

  QuickTime - Mac OS - Utilities

Reinstall OS X & Final Cut Studio The Right Way - Part 3 -   By David A. Saraceno      NEW

Reinstall OS X & Final Cut Studio The Right Way - Part 2 -   By David A. Saraceno      NEW

Reinstall OS X & Final Cut Studio The Right Way - Part 1 -   By David A. Saraceno      NEW

Formatting a Hard Drive for the Mac -   By Ken Stone

Sony - XD Formats and Drivers -   By Ken Stone

App Zapper - App Delete  - by Steve Douglas

Taming the Wild Blu, part 2...  - by Bruce Nazarian

Taming the Wild Blu, yonder...  - by Bruce Nazarian

Preprocessing in Compressor and Episode  - by Philip Hodgetts

Compressor H.264 movies from FCP for the Web  - by Ken Stone

QuickTime H.264 movies from FCP for the Web  - by Ken Stone

QuickTime Timecode Display  - by Brian Gary

Formatting & Partitioning a Hard Drive in OS X - Tiger and Leopard   - by Ken Stone      Updated for Leopard

Burning Data CDs and DVDs   - by Ken Stone      Updated for Leopard

How To Make Copies of DVDs -   by Ken Stone      Updated for Leopard

DVD-Rs for Media Back-up in FCP  - by Richard Taylor

Video To iPod   - by Ken Stone

Image to Disk   - by Ken Stone

Trashing Prefs in FCP 3, 4, 5 and 6 - OS X   - by Ken Stone

Restoring A Corrupt Final Cut Pro Project  - Scott Barbour

QuickTime Pro - QuickTime movies from FCP - For the Web.   - by Ken Stone

Multisession Burns Using Tiger's Disk Utility   -by Ken Stone

Upgrading to Tiger   - by Ken Stone

Partitioning a Hard Drive in OS X - Jaguar  - By Ken Stone

Final Cut Pro v.4.0 for Mac OS X an ambitious beginning...  - by Charles Roberts

Carbon Copy Cloner - OS X - Jaguar - Cloning your boot drive  - By Ken Stone

Troubleshooting Your Final Cut Pro System  - by Larry Jordan

Care and Feeding of Panther - OS X Drive Maintenance  - by Charles Roberts

Archiving Your FCP Project   - by Larry Jordan

Target Disk Mode (TDM) Networking with FireWire - Sort of  - by Ben Bryant

A Moviemakers Guide to "Wired" QuickTime   - Clifford VanMeter

When Good Apps Go Bad   - by Larry Jordan

Migrating to the PowerMac G5 and OSX Panther   - by Ned Soltz

File Journaling in OSX 10.3 (Panther) Explained   - Larry Jordan

Care and Feeding of Jaguar - OS X Drive Maintenance  - by Charles Roberts

[Top]

 

Final Cut Pro Settings  Versions 1.2.5 and older - Ken Stone

 

   Tutorial Reviews  Click Here

   Software - Plugin Reviews  Click Here

   Hardware and Reviews  Click Here

   Search  Click Here

   Discussions  Click Here

   Article Archive  Click Here

 

           

© 2000 -2010 Ken Stone. All rights reserved. Apple, the Apple logo, Final Cut Pro, Macintosh and Power Mac
are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Apple. Other company and product names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

All screen captures, images, and textual references are the property and trademark of their creators/owners/publishers.

 

 

Final Cut Pro 7 - Labels, Markers and Subclips

Save

November 9, 2009

 
Final Cut Pro 7 - Labels, Markers and Subclips

By Ken Stone

 
Sequence and Clip Markers
Extended Markers
Aligning Markers in the Timeline
Exporting Markers List as Text
Logging Markers
Subclips
Subclips from Markers
Subclips from Extended Markers
Notes

 
With each new roll out of Final Cut Pro, we always look to see what new features have been included. While there are often major new features, sometimes, some of FCP's existing features get updates as well. While these can be simple feature enhancements, they can have a large impact on how we use FCP. With the introduction of FCP 7, two items, Labels and Markers have received some attention and this has made life using FCP easier.

Labels
Labels have been around since the start and have traditionally been used to color code items in the Browser window, like Bins and Clips, to help keep things organized. While each color has a default name associated with it, the names can be easily changed. In the FCP menu > User Preferences > Labels tab, you can click on any name and change it. These settings are global, that is to say, that if you change the name of any label color, the new name will show wherever labels are used.

To color an item in the Browser window, Control (right click) on the item and from the Label section of the drop-down menu, pick a color. While the names of the colored labels my have value for some, for me it's always been the use of different colors that help me keep organized.

This color feature has now been extended, so that when we color code a sequence in the Browser window, the tab for that sequence in the timeline will be colored as well. While a seemingly small thing, this really helps when working with multiple sequences in a project, the coloring of the tabs gives us a visual clue as to which sequence we are working on in the timeline. I also use the same color for any bins that might belong to that sequence.

Another improvement to the tabs in the timeline, is the fact that we can now rearrange the position and order of the tabs, just click on a sequence tab and drag it to a new location.

Just as in the timeline where we can now reposition the sequence tabs, we can now do the same with the tabs in the Browser window. Click on any tab and drag to a new location.

There is one final touch to the tabs in the Browser window. The top of the Browser has Project tabs and the Effects tab, but additionally there can be bins that have been opened and placed at the top of the Browser window as well. In FCP 7, Project tabs now carry the FCP clap-stick icon to denote that they are projects.

Control (right click) on the tabs at the top of the Browser window or on tabs in the timeline and you have the option to 'Close Tab' or 'Close Other Tabs'. The 'Close Other Tabs' feature is new in FCP 7.

Again, these are small improvements but very useful none the less.

[Top]

 
Markers

Just like Labels, Markers have been around since the very start and have received an update in FCP 7 too. There are a number of different types of Markers; logging, extended, clip, sequence, chapter, compression, scoring, edit/cut, I'm sure I missed a few.

Sequence and Clip Markers
So, what is a Marker? A Marker is a visual cue that we place on a clip or sequence. We can name and color code Markers, add a title and text as comments, even assign a function to it, like making it a Chapter Marker. We can navigate quickly from marker to marker or use markers to align clips in a sequence, even create extended markers and turn them into subclips. We will start with Sequence and Clip markers because they have some new abilities that make them much more useful now. There are several ways to add a marker. Place the playhead at a location, in a clip or sequence, where you want to add a marker.

From the Mark menu > Markers > Add

If the sequence is active then when you add a marker, it will be placed on the sequence ruler. If you click on a clip, selecting it and then add a marker, the marker will be added to the clip.

But there is a much easier way to add markers and this can be done using the keyboard, either while the playhead is moving or stopped. When you hit the 'm' key a marker will be added. At this point the marker is simply a marker with no title, notes or special color or function assigned. You can navigate from marker to marker using the 'shift and m' keys to move down the timeline or 'option and m' to move back in the timeline. If the sequence is active then you will move from sequence marker to sequence marker. If the clip is selected, then you will move from clip marker to clip marker.

Double click on a clip in the Timeline to load it into the Viewer, the clip markers will show in the Viewer scrubber bar, with the marker number displayed in the window. The Canvas window shows all sequence markers. As you navigate between markers either in the Viewer, Timeline or Canvas window, each marker will be displayed in the scrubber bar and a small box with a marker number will appear in the window. What we have created so far is the simplest type of marker, we have not yet added a title, text, color or function to the markers. Marker numbers are replaced with titles when they are added.


Clip markers show in the Viewer window

Sequence markers show in the Canvas window.

 
If you add a marker to a clip in the Viewer window and then place the clip on the timeline, the clip marker will show there as well. But, because this is a clip marker, it will only show in the Viewer window, not in the Canvas window. Only sequence markers show in the Canvas window.

It can be easier to add markers than to delete them. There are several ways to clear all markers, from the Mark menu > Markers > 'Delete All'. We need to remember that we are dealing with two different types of markers, sequence markers and clip markers. If the sequence is active, then 'Delete All' will remove all of the sequence markers. If a clip is selected and the playhead is on the clip, then 'Delete All' will remove all of that clips' markers. If you have several clips with clip markers and you select the clips, 'Delete All' will only work for the clip that the playhead is on. You would have to delete clip markers from multiple clips, one clip at a time. It would be nice if we had two different commands from the Mark menu > Markers; 'Delete all Sequence markers' and 'Delete all Clip markers'.

When we want to delete just one marker from either a sequence or a clip, then the sequence or clip must be active (selected) and the playhead must be on the marker, then from the Mark menu > Markers > Delete. If the playhead is not on a marker, in either the sequence or clip, then 'Delete' from The Mark menu will be grayed out. Having Snapping on will help position the playhead exactly on a marker. You can always tell when you are exactly on a clip marker, because the marker will show in the Viewer window, (the clip must be loaded into the Viewer) and a sequence marker will show in the Canvas window.

In order to see markers in the Canvas window, Overlays must be turned on.

There is another way to clear sequence markers one at a time. Command click on a sequence marker, and while still holding down the Command key, drag the marker up and out of the sequence ruler. The marker will be deleted but there will be no puff of smoke. Unfortunately, Command drag does not work with clip markers, you'll need to place the playhead on the clip marker and then use the Mark menu > Markers > Delete, or hit the 'm' key which will open the Edit Markers window and click on the Delete button.


Hold down the Command key
and click on the sequence marker.

Continue to hold down the Command key
and drag the marker out of the timeline.

So far we have be working with simple markers, but most often we will want to use more advanced markers. To do this we will access the 'Edit Markers' window which has been improved in FCP 7. Hitting the 'm' key on the keyboard will apply a simple marker, hitting 'm' twice opens the Edit Marker window. If you already have a marker, navigating to the marker and hitting 'm' once will also open the Edit Marker window. What's new in the Edit Marker window are the 'Color' options, I have selected green for this example. Below right, is the marker displayed in the Canvas window. The marker in the Canvas window scrub bar is green as is the background color of the text box in the Canvas window. Having the ability to color code our markers is a real organizational convenience.

            

It is important to note that FCP uses three of the colors for the three different function markers; Purple for Chapter markers, Blue for Compression markers and Orange for Scoring markers. When you click on one of the function markers buttons, FCP will automatically set the proper color. These function markers are used when we send our video to Compressor, DVD Studio Pro, iDVD or SoundTrack Pro.

     

When using either the 'Send to Compressor' command from the File menu in FCP, or by exporting from FCP as a 'QuickTime Self-contained and selecting 'DVD Studio Pro markers' during export, two of the function markers, Chapter and Compression markers will show up in the Compressor Preview window with their color coding. The Compressor Preview window will also show Green 'Edit/Cut' markers which are added to the project automatically for us during 'Send to Compressor' or export 'QuickTime Self-contained'. These 'Edit/Cut' markers instruct Compressor to place an I frame at each 'Edit/Cut' marker. The Orange Scoring markers do not show in the Compressor Preview window, they are meant for SoundTrack Pro.

However, you can assign any of the available colors to your markers, even the ones that FCP uses for; Chapter, Compression, Edit/Cut or Scoring. It's is not the color that assigns functionality to the marker, functionality is added to the marker when you click on the Chapter, Compression or Scoring buttons in the Edit Marker window.

We now can add our own descriptors to each of the different color markers. From the Edit menu > Project Properties. I have assigned the title 'Narrative' to the color green. If you use a large number of differently colored markers and the scrubber bar or sequence ruler becomes overly populated with different colored markers, you can hide any colored marker from view by unchecking the 'Marker Visibility' box for that color. There is also 'Comment Column Headings' box where you can assign different 'Comments' names. This is helpful when using the Search feature in FCP. You can also search for your markers by using the names assigned in the 'Project Properties' window.

   

There is an other new feature that has been added to Markers in FCP 7. We have always been able to add simple markers to the sequence on the fly, but new in FCP 7, is the ability to open the 'Edit Marker' window at the same time and enter Name, Comment and even select marker colors, all while FCP is playing in RT. Of course this will probably only work well with long clips and you'll need to be a very fast typist.

From the Tools menu > Button List. Start to type in the word 'Marker'. You will be offered a button called 'Add and Edit Marker'. Click on the button in the list and drag it to your timeline. Now, while you are playing the timeline, clicking on this button will open the 'Edit Marker' window and you can type in your information, all while FCP is playing. You can use the 'Add and Edit Marker' button at any time and in place of 'm' from the keyboard.

         

Another important new Marker feature in FCP is the ability to move Markers up and down the timeline. Shown below is a section from the timeline with markers in place. I am going to reposition the orange marker.

Right side, between the green and purple marker is the orange marker. While holding down the Command key, I then click and drag the orange marker (playhead snaps to marker) to any location in the timeline. In this case I have moved it a bit to the left.

Now this is interesting, you can even drag a marker past another marker to a new location. As shown below, I have dragged the orange marker to the left, past the green marker.

The orange marker that started to the right of the green marker is now to the left of the green marker. Unfortunately this little trick does not work with clip markers, you can not drag them around.

If you need to reposition a clip marker, select the clip, then move your playhead to the new position and from the Mark menu > Markers > Reposition. However, and I know that this is a little crazy, but the playhead must be to the right of the clip marker in order to be able select Reposition from the Mark > Markers menu. If there are multiple clip markers on a clip, Reposition will only work on the marker that is to the left of the playhead. This means that you can only reposition a clip marker down the timeline, not back up the timeline. There really is no good way to reposition clip markers.

        

If while dragging a marker to a new position you accidently drag out of the timeline ruler, the marker will disappear, not to worry, as long as you continue to hold down the mouse button, you can drag back into the timeline ruler and the marker will reappear.

We have all built timelines and then added markers, like Chapter markers, only to discover that somewhere in the sequence, we either need to add or remove some video, which changes the duration of the sequence. Up until now, sequence markers have been 'glued' in place to the timeline ruler, immovable, intractable. If we change the duration of the sequence, all of the markers, from the point of the change on down to the end of the sequence, will no longer be positioned properly. They will have gone out of sync. With what is probably the most important new marker feature, we now have the option to 'Ripple Sequence Markers'. That is to say, that when we change the duration of a sequence by adding or trimming video, the markers will 'ripple' to match the change, and as a result, the markers will stay in the correct position relative to the video. So important is this new feature that Apple has placed a 'Ripple Sequence Marker' button on the timeline for us, with this feature turned on by default. You can also enable this feature from the Sequence menu > 'Ripple Sequence Markers'. And if you were wondering, clip markers ripple just like sequence markers. To me, this is a big deal.

          

[Top]

 
Extended Markers
The markers that we have worked with so far are placed on just one frame, they have no duration. But it is possible to extend both sequence and clip markers. This can be useful when you need to add comments or instructions for a particular portion of a clip. As shown below, working in the timeline, I have added a marker, 'Narrative' and instructions in the Comment box.

The timeline is shown below with the one marker in place.

In this case I want to mark out just how long the narrative lasts. In the timeline I have moved my playhead to the point where I want the narrative to end.

From the Mark menu > Markers > Extend. Or, use the keyboard shortcut, Option Tilde. The Tilde key is the key just beneath the 'esc' key, top left of the keyboard.

The Extended marker now shows in the timeline.

After extending the marker, hitting 'm' on the keyboard opens the Edit Marker window. It is possible to add a marker at the end of the extended marker and add Comments.

When we extend a marker, the marker will display in the Canvas window whenever the playhead is over any part of the extension. It is also possible to extend markers across multiple clips.

        

If you know the exact duration that you want to extend the marker, when you set the marker, in the Edit Marker window, there is a 'duration' box.

If you need to change the duration of either a sequence or clip marker, shorten or lengthen, place your playhead where you now want the extension to end, (below left). From the Mark menu > Markers > Extend. The duration of the extension will be changed, (below right). You can also open the Edit Marker window and enter a new Duration.

        

[Top]

 
Aligning Markers in the Timeline
It turns out that Markers have some other utilitarian abilities, we can use a marker in one clip to align to a marker in another clip, works with both audio or video clips. In order to get this marker to marker alignment behavior, we need to have Snapping turned on in the timeline. As shown below, the clip in the timeline is selected and the playhead is positioned at the frame I want to align to, a marker has been added.

I have a shot of the moon that I want to use in the timeline. After loading the clip into the Viewer window, I have positioned my playhead where I want the moon shot to begin and set a marker.

Dragged the Moon clip out of the Viewer window and brought it down to the timeline. As shown below, you can see the yellow marker in the clip on the timeline. The marker in the Moon shot is visible, red box below. Note that both the video and audio show the markers. When dragging, the markers always display as 'ghost' markers, with a vertical snapping line.

I then slide the Moon clip along the timeline until the marker in the Moon clip snaps to the yellow marker in the timeline.

The two sets of markers are now aligned to each other.

The same process can be done with clips that are already on the timeline. Add a clip marker and then drag to position over clip with marker.

While it is necessary to have a marker on the clip you are moving, not so for the clip that you are moving to. Markers will snap to markers, but a marker will also snap to the playhead. Below I have removed the marker on the 'Highland Bulls' clip and positioned my playhead where I want to align the second clip. Just drag the clip with the marker until it snaps to the playhead.

This process can be helpful when aligning video clips but would most likely be used when one needed to insert some audio at a particular point in the timeline. For example, I have a street scene and I need to add a horn honk at an exact place in time. I have loaded a .aif file into the Viewer and set my marker at the start of the horn honk. Because this audio clip is stereo, there are two markers, one for each audio track, but you only have to set one marker.

In the audio 'Patch Panel, lower left of the timeline, I have moved the audio patches down to A3 and A4. Now, in the Viewer window, I click on the audio 'grabber hand speaker' icon and drag the icon to the Canvas and Overwrite. This drops the 'Horn Honk' audio on to A3 and A4.

Click on the Audio clip in A3 and A4 and drag to the right until it snaps to the clip marker in the video 'Street Scene'.

The audio clip markers are now aligned with the video clip marker. This process will also work if you place a sequence marker over the video clip where you want the audio to align.

[Top]

 
Logging Markers
Markers can be added during the Logging process.

  • Twirl down the Marker disclosure triangle.
  • Move to the frame that you want to add a marker to, using the play controls in the Preview window and enter a marker name in the 'Marker' box.
  • Enter comments into the Comments box.
  • There is a timecode Marker In and Marker Out box, that you can use to set starting and ending markers using timecode.
  • Click on the 'Set Marker' button.
  • The information that you have entered in the Marker window will attached to the clip and will pass through into the Browser for use in editing.

[Top]

 
Exporting Markers List as Text
We can export our Marker Lists as a tab-delimited text file that can be opened by Excel or Numbers, spreadsheet applications. The file format can be modified, columns can be renamed and repositioned and the files can be printed out.

Select the sequence or clip whose markers you want to export. From the File menu > Export > Markers List as Text.

In the Save dialog box, enter a name and destination. At the bottom of the window is the 'Export' drop-down menu where you can specify which types of markers you want to export.

          

Your Markers List Text file has a .txt extension.

I have used Apple's Numbers spreadsheet application to open the Markers List Text file. The default columns are;

  • Sequence or clip name.
  • Type, Sequence or clip.
  • Marker name, or if no name was given then a marker number will be used.
  • Comment, either a comment that you entered or one of the functional markers; , , and .
  • Starting Timecode.
  • Duration.
  • Assigned marker color.

[Top]

 
Subclips
Subclips are shorter clips that are made from larger master clips. Subclipping can be very helpful if you are working with one long master clip, as you can break the master into as many smaller subclips as you need (not unlike DV Start/Stop Detection). While the master clip is in the Viewer, you can make any number of subclips from the master. When you make a subclip, FCP will give it the name of the master clip and add 'subclip' to the name and then place it back into the same project bin as the master clip. If you make more than one subclip from a master, FCP will append it with a number, You can rename and label subclips. Subclip can be loaded back into the Viewer window, have In and Out points set, and be edited as a normal clip. Any changes you make to the subclip will have no effect on the master clip. It is now independent of the master. If you are working on a subclip and, for any reason, need to go beyond it's duration limits, select the subclip and from the Modify Menu > Remove Subclip Limits. This will restore the subclip to the full length of the master clip. You can now set new In and Out points for it.

One way to make subclips is to load a clip into the Viewer window, and set In and Out points.

From the Modify menu > Make Subclip. The new subclip will be placed back into the Browser. You can always tell a subclip by its jagged edges.

[Top]

 
Subclips from Markers
In FCP we can also make subclips by using Markers. To make a subclip from a master clip using markers, load the master clip from the Browser into the Viewer window.

Move the playhead in the Viewer scrubber bar to the position that you want to start your subclip and hit 'm' on the keyboard. As you can see below, 'Marker 1' has been added to the master clip in the Viewer window. In addition to having the marker added in the Viewer window, back in the Browser window, the master clip now has a disclosure triangle and the marker that we just made has been placed inside the Browser. You will notice that the new marker has an 'In' point that represents the position of the playhead on the master clip in the Viewer window when we added a marker. The Browser shows 'Not Set' for the Out point because we did not set one in the Viewer.

In the Browser, select the Marker and then, from the Modify menu > 'Make Subclip'.

A subclip has now been made from the master clip. The subclip starts at the position in the clip where the marker was added in the Viewer window. The subclip will be placed back into the same bin in the Browser that holds the master clip, the subclip is denoted by its torn edges.

If you place a master clip into the Viewer window and apply a number of markers, each marker will be added back in the Browser. The starting point for each new marker will become the end point for the previous marker. The duration of each marker is determined from one marker to the next.

Select all of the markers and from the Modify menu > Make Subclip. This will add the subclips to the Browser. Looking below you'll see that while markers are limited by the In and Out column, the subclips generated from those markers do not have In and Outs. Rather subclips have 'Media Start' and 'Media End' times.

[Top]

 
Subclips from Extended Markers
The process of making subclips from extended markers is done in the same way that we made subclips from simple markers. Load a clip from the Browser into the Viewer and set a marker where you want the subclip to begin. As before, when we add a marker to a clip in the Viewer, a marker is added to the master clip in the Browser in the disclosure triangle.

Now, in the Viewer, move the playhead to where you want the subclip to end.

From The Mark menu > Markers > Extend

In the Viewer, the marker will now extend to the position of the playhead. If you'll look back in the Browser window, you'll see that that 'Marker 1' now has an 'Out' point to match the extended marker in the Viewer.

Select the Marker in the Browser and from the Modify menu > Make Subclip.

The subclip made from 'Marker 1' has been added back into the Browser in the same bin as both the master clip and 'Marker 1'. The subclip does not have In and Out points but rather Media Start and Media End points.

[Top]

 
Notes

  • When extending markers, rather then go to the Mark menu > Markers > Extend, every time, use the keyboard shortcut, Option Tilde. The Tilde key is the key just beneath the 'esc' key, top left of the keyboard.
  • In the FCP manual, page 469, it states that it is possible to have two or more markers on the same frame and that if you need to edit one of the markers, move to the frame with the markers, then hit the 'm' key to open the Edit Marker dialog box. At the top of the Edit Marker window is supposed to be a 'Choose Marker' pop-up menu in which you can select which marker you want to edit. While I do have two markers on several different frames in my timeline, my Edit Marker window offers no 'Choose Marker' pop-up menu.
  • This article covers both FCP Labels and Markers. Each of these can have their names changed to suit your editing needs, but it is important to note that Labels and Markers are completely independent of each other. Changing the color name of one will have no effect on the other.
  • If you are working with DV, DVCAM, DVCPRO, DVCPRO 50, or DVCPRO HD formats, FCP will set a 'Start/Stop' flag in the metadata of the clip, which will show up as a marker in the Browser window. You can use these 'Start/Stop' markers to create subclips. The FCP Start/Stop feature is based on 'time of day' and not on timecode.
  • When creating subclips from markers, the new subclips will be come Master clips and be completely independent of the clip from which they came.
  • Subclips have been made from clip markers that were set in the Viewer window.

    If, after you have made subclips from the markers in the Browser, and you then delete the markers in the Browser, the markers will disappear from the clip in the Viewer window, but the subclips will remain.

  • After you have created subclips, you can load them back into the Viewer and add clip markers to the subclips.
  • Should you need to recapture video in your project that contains subclips, you need to know that FCP will recapture the entire Master clip that the subclip came from.

 
Enjoy,

--ken

 
[Top]

copyright © www.kenstone.net 2009

© 2000 -2009 Ken Stone. All rights reserved. Apple, the Apple logo, Final Cut Pro, Macintosh and Power Mac
are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Apple. Other company and product names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

All screen captures, images, and textual references are the property and trademark of their creators/owners/publishers.

YouTube - Final Cut Pro 7 Unscripted - Speed Segments / Freeze Frames

Save
Final Cut Pro 7 Unscripted - Speed Segments / Freeze Frames

Adding Titles and Text to Clips

Save

Adding Titles and Text to Clips

You can add a title or some text to a clip, such as the name of a person who appears in the clip.

To do this, double click on a clip in the Timeline to display it in the Viewer at the top. Then at the bottom of the Viewer click on the button with a large A on it, which is the text button.

Hold down your mouse button and in the drop-down menu select:

Text...Text

Then release your mouse button.

In the Viewer area will appear a screen with sample text in it.

To change the sample text, click on the tab entry at the top labeled:

Controls

A box will appear on your screen in the Viewer area.

You change the text of the title by just typing new words into the box.

Below the box are selections for:

  • Changing the font face of the text
  • Changing the font size of the text
  • Changing the Font Color by clicking on the white box to the right and selecting a new color for the text (yellow is a color that usually works well on most clips).
  • Aligning the title on the screen, such as centering it, making it flush to the left or making it flush to the right.

You also can add a drop shadow to the title by selecting the Motion tab and checking the box for Drop Shadow.

Finally, you can change the duration of the text (how long it will appear on your clip) by selecting the Video tab and then changing the time in the box at the top left.

Now to place the text on your Timeline, click on the Video tab.

Then move your playhead on the Timeline to the point in a clip where you want your text to begin.

Now click in the Viewer on the text you created, hold down your mouse button, drag it down onto the Timeline just above the clip and at the point of the playhead, and release it. The text will be placed on a new track above your clip.

You should see a green line appear just above the clip on the Timeline, which means the text has been applied and you can view it by playing the clip.

Move the playhead on the Timeline to a point prior to the clip and play the clip to see the text displayed.

(If there's a red line above the text instead of a green line, that means you'll need to render the text before you can play and view it.)

To make adjustments to your text, double click on it in the Timeline to display it in the Viewer, and then follow the steps above to make changes.

Positioning the Text

You also can change the position of the text - moving it anywhere you want on the screen - by creating a wireframe to drag the title to different points on the screen.

To do that, double click on the text you've created in the Timeline, to display it in the Viewer and in the Canvas.

in the Canvas area to the right, click on the the tiny box toward the top right that has a hole in it.

In the drop-down menu that appears, select:

Image+Wireframe

A wireframe will appear over your title, with an image of the clip underneath. Click on the point in the middle where the lines intersect, and you can drag the title anywhere on the screen.

When you're done positioning the text, to place the new text on your Timeline, in the Viewer to the left make sure the Video tab is selected.

Then move your playhead on the Timeline to the point where you placed the beginning of your existing title.

Now in the Viewer above click on the new text you created, hold down your mouse button, and drag it down onto the Timeline to the point of the playhead and on the tack where your existing title is. Release your mouse button, and the new text will replace the old text on the Timeline.

Lower 3rd Title

Some common text to use on a video clip is a "Lower Third" title, which appears toward the bottom of a clip and has two lines on it - one for a title and a second just below for a subtitle (such as a listing of a person's name, with their occupation or affiliation listed in slightly smaller type underneath).

If you want to add a Lower Third title to a clip, double click on a clip in the Timeline to display it in the Viewer at the top. Then at the bottom of the Viewer click on the button with a large A on it, which is the title button.

Hold down your mouse button and in the drop-down menu select:

Title...Lower 3rd

You can change the properties of the text in this title - the size, color, position, etc. - using the same steps described above for changing the attributes of text.

But this time there will be two sets of controls - one for the main title, and one just underneath for the subtitle.

You also can add a rectangular color bar behind a lower third title to better display it on the screen.

You would do this, for example, if there's a lot of variety in the color of the video to which you're applying the title and the title thus doesn't display well against that varied background. The title will display much better if its on top of a color bar.

To add a color bar, select the Controls tab, scroll down the line for Background and select Solid. You then can change the color of the bar, by clicking below on the white box to the right of the word Color.

Now to place the title on your Timeline, click on the Video tab.

Then move your playhead on the Timeline to the point in a clip where you want your title to begin.

Now click in the Viewer on the title you created, hold down your mouse button, drag it down onto the Timeline just above the clip and at the point of the playhead, and release it. The title will be placed on a new track above your clip.

You should see a green line appear just above the clip on the Timeline, which means the title has been applied and you can view it by playing the clip.

Move the playhead on the Timeline to a point prior to the clip and play the clip to see the title displayed.

(If there's a red line above the title instead of a green line, that means you'll need to render the title before you can play and view it.)

To make adjustments to your title, double click on it in the Timeline to display it in the Viewer, and then follow the steps above to make changes.

Final Cut Pro 7 Essential Training: Creating a freeze frame and still image

Save
He shows how to grab the freeze frame using the Modify>Make Freeze frame drop down command. He then shows how to create a still image and how to choose the file format that Final Cut enables you to save to.

Best Formats for Uploading

Save

Best Formats for Uploading

YouTube can accept almost any video format for upload, but for most users we have found the following settings give the best results.

  • Video Format: H.264, MPEG-2 or MPEG-4 preferred
  • Aspect Ratio: Native aspect ratio without letterboxing (examples: 4:3, 16:9)
  • Resolution: 640x360 (16:9) or 480x360 (4:3) recommended
  • Audio Format: MP3 or AAC preferred
  • Frames per second: 30
  • Maximum length: 10 minutes (we recommend 2-3 minutes)
  • Maximum file size: 1 GB